Worship

God places worship at the forefront of our lives. Worship allows us to focus on someone who is far greater than ourselves, our situation or our feelings. Worship allows us to connect with God and experience intimacy with him. Worship can be a form of prayer, it can help us to understand more about God and it can help us to understand how much we owe him.

This song is from the recent service where churches in Inverness got together on-line to celebrate a national week of prayer called Thy Kingdom come and Pentecost. It was great to be able to do something together in an expression of unity which is still being a blessing to others. You will recognise some of the people in this video.

The Bible gives singers a particular place. The metaphor of war is difficult for us to understand in our modern context but in the Bible, in 2 Chronicles 20:20-23 singers go ahead of an army and the army is successful. What could be more critical to a country that has to defend itself than an army, and God’s way seems to be to put worship ahead of that army. In human terms you would put your most skilful, fiercest warriors ahead of the army, but God’s way is to put vulnerable singers there! Worship, in spiritual terms seems to be stronger than a physical army!

God also highly values music of all kinds. Psalm 150 is a celebration of God and of worshipping him. The Psalm is a wave of enthusiasm for praising him in different places and for how amazing he is. It lists many different instruments such as the trumpet, harp, pipes, stringed instruments and includes different kinds of drums and cymbals. It also lists dancing as a way to worship him and it is an encouragement to us to worship Him in lots of creative ways.

What this tells us is that God places a high value on worship, and it tells us that our first response to difficult situations should be to worship Him, whether they be personal, or collective ones such as the current Corona Virus situation.

We asked our worship team and people in the Barn Church what songs they find themselves singing, playing and listing to and why. Particularly thinking about what the words of songs say to them, how the words or tunes make them feel, and to say a little about when they might listen to a particular worship song. These are some of the things they said. We hope that these songs and what what people have said about them help you to worship God and deepen your relationship with Him.

Carol’s Worship Song

My most favourite song is by Andrew Peterson and it’s called Is He Worthy. It’s the most beautiful and powerful song I have ever heard.The inspiration for the song is taken from Revelation Chapter 5 – where we get one of the most staggering images of who Jesus is and what he has done for us and all of his creation. The prophet John is weeping because no one can be found who is worthy to break the seal and open the scroll. And then Jesus appears, a Lion and a Lamb, ascending the throne, revealing his glory to the Angels and archangels and elders, and most astonishing of all to you and me. All of heaven bursts into song.  This time last year Andrew Peterson travelled all the way from the USA to sing this one song at a concert in Belfast and I was privileged to be part of the choir that sang along with him. It was an experience I will never forget.

Lynda’s Worship Song

“Oh Lord My God”, this is a hymn that is important to me not only for the significance of the words, but equally in some significant events in my life where this hymn featured which include both my own wedding and more recently at my mums funeral.

I always feel that the hymn could have been written for this part of the world in its celebration of nature, we have amazing scenery around us including the “forest glades complete with bird song” and “lofty mountain splendour”. It points to celebrating God the Great Creator. The second half of the hymn is even more significant as it points to God the Saviour, sending His own Son in our place to set us free and in the final verse to recognise that death can now be encountered with “shouts of acclamation”, it holds no fear, probably why the hymn is equally suitable for a wedding or a funeral. Singing has always been a big part of my life and so the thought of singing with my whole soul, not just words,  really appeals to me.

Andrew’s Worship Song

Raise a Hallelujah – I like this song because it was written at a time when the whole church got behind a little boy and it confirms that God heals today.

You can hear the truly amazing story behind the song here by watching this video:

Lorna’s Worship Song

Siyahamba – this song means a lot to me because it reminds me of a Barn summer mission in 1998 when Etta Robertson led a group of children into the church during the final evening of it.

Remembering good times and what God has done is a biblical tradition and songs can help us do that.

Kirsty’s Worship Song

Shout to the Lord – this song is meaningful or me because I learned it as a child and because Stef Robertson taught us a form of sign language to it which brought the song alive.

Douglas’ Worship Songs

The UK Blessing – the song of the moment for me must be The UK Blessing. It is an amazing song and the way it has been creatively put together in this version is a reflection of the creative gifts that God has blessed people and his church with. It is also a real expression of unity and togetherness at a time where we have to remain physically apart and of God’s heart to be a blessing to people.

It is difficult to say what my favourite worship song is, but this is one of them “Jesus Paid it All”. I think because it focuses so much on what Jesus has done for us. I also like the tune, it seems to lift your spirit as you sing it. The song was written by American, Elvina Hall in 1865 when she was 45 years old. Sometimes we all find it difficult to stay focused in church, and I like that she wrote it inside the cover of her hymn book one day in church, then gave it to her pastor who had recently been given a new tune by his organist, John Grape and the pastor put the two together to create the song we sing today.